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Scott Hove is a San Francisco based artist, he is self taught and his work encompasses a broad variety of media, from sculptural installations to painting. These works reflect on the relationship between the natural world and mechanical civilization, and the drama that occurs during this interaction. The materials and techniques borrow from traditional and decorative arts and craft to render the jarring objects and fantasy installations. I liked the look of his work because of my interest in the use of sweet objects to convey a darker message, and his work uses this same idea of contrasts. The installation i am looking at is called Cakeland and was started in 2005

“Experimenting with new media, especially decorative media not normally associated with fine art, is part of my search as a sculptor to keep my hands interested and to deliver my message with a clear impact. This body of work is a result of self-education, a lifelong interest in artificial food and objects, and an obsession with the relationship between the beautiful and the brutal.”

Why then, to use an absurd media like fake cake to describe such a story? We all love cake and what it signifies. Celebration. Important occasion. Indulgence. Reward. It is fortunate for myself and my sculptures that our minds are highly suggestive, and that we are willing to tolerate the idea of  something artificial to represent what we desire. The representation itself becomes that which is most desirable. These sculptures celebrate the beauty, rapaciousness and absurdity we all participate in.

The cakes are typically constructed out of a carvable polyurethane sculpting foam, which is shaped with handheld Japanese woodcarving knives and rasps. They are then frosted and decorated with a variety of thickened acrylic gels, using traditional cake decorator tools and pastry bags. They are then accessorized with assorted media: mirrors, switchblades, taxidermy jaws, pills… some are purchased, some are found on the street near my studio in Oakland.

The Installations are either constructed as permanent or temporary structures, and generally utilize cardboard, theatrical lighting, full length mirrors, hand-made chandeliers, and whatever else is available on hand that could lend itself well to the atmosphere.”

above is the information on his website about the installations, i like the idea of fake sweets being used, because it signifies how people are willing to settle for imitation as long as it appears they are achieving their desires. there are alot of examples in real life of people settling for fake when they can’t get their real dreams , like when someone on a diet buys a weight watchers cake , because it looks like the cake they want and they can rely on this even when the taste isn’t what they really want. I am going to get some silicone and various other materials and try using fake sweets in my work because i think they could be more durable, i am glad i have found this artist as a reference. Because i think it also references my concept about Kim Jong Un portraying himself to his people as this wonderful human being, like how he has told them that their country won the world cup this year (ridiculous) but underneath this apparent sweetness that he likes to give the impression of  is a harsh disgusting character, much like how fake sweets would leave a horrible taste in your mouth so would he.

images i liked from his installation:scott-hove-cakeland-09 Scott-Hove-Ice-Cake download

I particularly like his use of sweet imagery and materials, combined with more contrasting threatening imagery like the cake gun, i think it defines the idea i had about the sugar coating of world issues like war, in a beautiful way. I certainly have felt inspired by this artist and his ideas, i hope to explore his methods and hopefully use this inspiration in my final piece.

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